Researching POWs U-Z

      Waddle, Robert A Waddle, Robert A

      Warner,William Robert, Able Seaman - HMS Repulse Warner,William Robert, Able Seaman - HMS Repulse

      Waters, Richard Albun, Gunner 1777633 Waters, Richard Albun, Gunner 1777633

      Wilson David Thomas (Tommy) 1119334 Wilson, David Thomas (Tommy) 1119334

       

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Waddle, Robert A

      taranaki - from Fepow Message Board

      Waddle, Robert A and Kathleen E - Singapore

      Posted 1-1-2003 10:54 Seeking information on:

      Robert A Waddle, who spent 1942-1945 in Changi as civilian internee;worked engineer for British Govt, organist St Andrews Church.

      and

      Kathleen E Waddle, died 14/2/42, passenger on "Vyner Brooke". Principal Raffles Girl School, Singapore 1937-42.

      Arthur Lane - >Ms Waddle,

      Viewed your message today, I would suggest that you contact:
      George Prior
      8a One Tree Hill Singapore 248676.
      he is a former POW similar to myself.
      George was the secretary of St Georges Church, Tanglin Garrison. Still living today after serving as a police inspector in Singapore.
      He also assisted in the publication of a book, "The new Beginings" a history of the church from inception. I can lend you a copy if required.
      Good luck and happy new year

       

 

 

 

Warner,William Robert, Able Seaman - HMS Repulse

      annie - Able Seaman William Robert Warner - HMS Repulse

      My Uncle survived the sinking of the Repulse, was sent to Sumatra, where he was captured by the Japanese. He died 14 September 1942 and is buried at THANBYUZAYAT WAR CEMETERY Myanmar. I have been trying to find out information about his last few months as a prisoner. My surviving Uncle disputes the MODs official record, that Bill was taken prisoner and interned in Singapore, as after the war a Petty Officer came to see my Gran and told her that he was sent to Sumatra and then on to Malaya. The fact that he is buried a 1000 miles from Singapore would certainly back this up!

      A memorial page has been set up for him on the
      www.forcez-survivors.org.uk web page. I have forwarded to them a photograph of my uncle and also a copy of his service record, along with the little information that I have about him.

      Is anyone able to help me find out more about him?

      Annie

      Keith - >Annie, There are two possible reasons your Uncle was in Sumatra. One, he was captured at Singapore and shipped to Sumatra by the Japanese, or two, he escaped from Singapore, or was evacuated from Singapore, and captured by the Japanese on Sumatra. Either way, Sumatra he was on, and may well have been a member of the British Sumatra Battalion under Captain D.P.Apthorp. His record of the British Sumatra Battalion is at the IWM. This party sailed on the "England Maru" on 15/5/42, and arrived at Mergui, Burma on 25/5/42.
      Your uncle is noted in a book I have as passing away at Tavoy where they were put to work building airfields, also in Burma on 14/9/42. He would have been re-buried at Thanbyuzayat after the war when all the war dead were concentrated in major military cemeterys. If I can help further, please let me know. I may know a little more. MOD records could be correct.

      Keith - Ann, This is a copy of a reply sent to Ann direct in response to her search. If anyone reading this, and her message that started this trail, and can help, please do. I am sure she will appreciate any help anyone can give.
      Thanks
      Keith Andrews
      Dear Ann,

      It is good to hear from you, and at least your Uncle has confirmed that your Uncle Bill was evacuated from Singapore to Sumatra. This happened with the survivors of the Prince of Wales and Repulse, so we have solved that mystery, or should I say you have.

      You are correct that your Uncle Bill died before being put to work on the Railway, and something struck a cord.
      The book in question is "Sunset over Saigon" by Ken Maguire.
      This covers the story of the British Sumatra Battalion, from its time of formation after the surrender to the Japanese at Padang, to the Japanese surrender in 1945. The term book is a little
      incorrect as it is only 64 pages, but very informative.
      The commander of this force was Captain (later Major) Dudley Apthorp, and I believe that a copy of the British Sumatra Battalion history and maybe his diary are with the Imperial War Museum. Next time I visit, I will have a good look, but I do know he has records there, as I have seen them.
      The next port of call for you that should provide more
      information is;


      British Far East Prisoner of War Grave Archives,
      Mr.P.G.Dunstan,
      23, Page Street,
      Mill Hill,
      London, NW7 2EL.

      Peter was one of the Royal Marines on the Prince of Wales, and fought in Singapore as part of the Plymouth Argyll's. He spent three and a half years on the Railway. Please enclose a stamped self addressed envelope to keep his costs down. Please feel free to tell him I pointed you his way, and to use any information I have supplied. He may be able to tell you how and where your Uncle passed away.

      The Sumatra Battalion departed Padang, the capital of Sumatra 9/5/42, arrived at the Medan 12/5/42 and the small port of Belawan Dewi. They sailed on the "England Maru" for Mergui in Burma. Conditions on board were not good to say the least.
      They arrived at Mergui on 25/5/42, and left for Tavoy on 10/8/42, arriving on 11/8/42.
      They left Tavoy bound for the Burma end of the Railway on 21/10/42.
      By then your Uncle had passed away, his death being noted as 14/9/42 at Tavoy.
      His grave at Tavoy must have been well marked, as after the war, all identified and known graves from the Burma area and Burma end of the Railway were reburied in the Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery at Thanbyuzayat, where he now rests.
      Looking at the CWGC site, the grave reference is B5. B. 6. I also note that he is listed as serving with HMS Sultan, Royal Navy.
      This is interesting, as I bet this may not appear on his official service record, although I could be wrong. HMS Sultan was I believe a Singapore shore base, which would follow as the Repulse had been sunk before the Fall of Singapore.
      Now, you remember that I first answered your message on the FEPOW Community message board, well go back to that site and the message board, click on page 2 of the message board, scroll down until you find the topic heading HMS Sultan. Click on that to open it, and scroll down to the message from Paul Morrell as it gives a web site to visit. Click on the website, and you find that this is about the Prince of Wales and the Repulse. It gives a lot of information regarding the trip out to the Far East, the sinking, and what went on afterwards. It will fill in a little more detail, and Paul Morrell's information is good, we have helped each other out in the past.

      I mentioned earlier this all struck a cord. Last year I helped someone try to trace the fate of his Uncle, who served with the 3rd HAA, a Gunner D.T.Thomas, who was with the same party as your Uncle, and also rests in the same cemetery, and also appears in the same book.
      Ann, I hope this is of some use in your search, if I can be of further help, please keep in touch. If you want to put this with the rest of the information regarding your Uncle on the Force Z please do so, it may help someone else in their search.

      Keith - >I hope you all had a great Christmas.

      This message is being sent out in the hope you may be able to help Ann Norton. I picked up her original message from the FEPOW Community Message Board, but things have progressed since then. Below is an edited version of my last message to Ann, followed by her account of what has been discovered about her Uncle so far. She is looking to find someone her knew her Uncle, either on the Repulse, at Singapore, on Sumatra, or when part of the British Sumatra Battalion. Both she and I realise this is a very long shot, but any information that can be supplied will be gratefully received. For my part, I could not trace the ship that evacuated her Uncle to Sumatra, and he was evacuated,this was confirmed after the war by a fellow shipmate. All replies will be forwarded to Ann, as will any e-mail addresses unless otherwise stated. I hope that this information may be of help to others who may be trying to trace members of the British Sumatra Battalion.
      Kindest regards
      Keith.

      Dear Ann,

      So, to start at the beginning of what I hope for you will be a very interesting, but alas a very sad e-mail. I say sad because my trip to the IWM on December 13th uncovered information on the death of your Uncle.

      But first, the Able Seaman from the Repulse whose son I said I would contact. Andy has this information on his site, the son is Alan Matthews, and his father is Ted Matthews. Jonathan Moffatt knew him as he made a television programme with him that was shown on the History Channel Saturday night and again early Sunday morning, about the Fall of Singapore.
      In the copy of the book I sent you, “Sunset over Saigon” is some drawings. Sgt. Major E.G.V. Burgoyne, Royal Corps of Signals, is the man responsible for them. If Ted Matthews is unable to help, Eric is your next best bet to finding someone who may have known your Uncle.

      If you want to find more information on Thanbyuzayat, I can direct to you pages on the COFEPOW site for some additional information.

      We now turn to my visit to the IWM on Friday 13th December. I requested information regarding areas I involving my father and three others in his Regiment I was seeking information on for their next of kin, and I also asked for any information on Captain A.W.Apthorp, AND any on the British Sumatra Battalion.
      The result of this request was a file I had seen before, ref Misc. 91 Item 1339, and the information in this file is contained in the book I sent you. File P259 is another matter, and one I had not seen before, and is headed “Major A.W.Apthorp” It consists of seven sub files, which are as follows:

      DPA 1 – contains a resume of the following files, plus a copy of what is in Misc.91
      DPA2/1 – this is the goldmine of information, the hand written Nominal Roll of the British (Sumatra) POW Battalion, that departed from Padang 9/5/42.
      DPA2/2 – is a typed version of the above, but not as informative. This would have been done after the war.
      DPA3 – Funds notebook
      DPA4/1 – Diary with Diagrams
      DPA4/2 – Diary with no diagrams. This information from both is in “Sunset”
      DPA4/3 – Sketches of the Burma Siam Railway by Sgt. E.G.W.Burgoyne, Royal Corps of Signals.
      DPA5 – Report to IS9, Room 327, War Office, 30/11/45 by Capt. Apthorp, Royal Norfolk Regiment
      DPA6 – Correspondence after the war in tracing missing POWs.
      DPA7 – Map of Lower Burma, plus plans of various cemeteries, all on the Burma Siam Railway, and in Saigon. (Tavoy is not included).

      I have not requested photocopies of this information as it covers events after the death of your Uncle, but I have made notes that I hope you, and your Uncle Russell will find of interest.
      DPA2/1 – The hand written nominal roll of the Battalion. This is original, and I imagine compiled and kept at great risk to those involved. Discovery of written records normally resulted in sever punishment or execution of the individual(s) involved.
      The pages of this book are divided into columns across the page, but for ease of reading, I will list the headings and the entries made for your Uncle:

      Name – Warner W R
      Number – DJ/X 152064
      Rank – AB
      Unit – RN
      Kumi – blank, as this did not apply at this stage
      Religion – RC
      Date of Birth – 14/6/21
      Address – c/o J. Scott, Nurseries, Marriot, Somerset (this is not shown on the CWGC site entry)
      Next of Kin – Mother
      Cause of Death – DYS = Dysentery
      Grave Number – PW D7 (this would have been at Tavoy. After the war, he would have been disinterred, and reburied at Thanbyuzayat Military Cemetery with full military honours)
      Misc. – Died 14/9/42
      Remarks – Tavoy

      DPA5 – this was the one file I did consider copying, as it does provide background information on several areas.
      Part 2 of the report is headed Treatment, and lists 3 camps in Burma the Battalion were in once the arrived from Sumatra. I will put the details of each camp on a spreadsheet, and forward them to you, but the three camps were;
      Mergui - National High School Camp – 25/5/42 – 21/6/43
      Mergui – New Camp – 21/6/42 – 10/8/42
      Tavoy – Ann Heseldine Home Camp – 11/8/42 – 21/10/42

      The Tavoy camp was the last camp your Uncle was in. Sanitary arrangements were inadequate as noted in the file, and this could have contributed to your Uncles passing.

      Another heading is Casualties, and the following is noted under that heading;
      All were given a Military Funeral, with Escort, Pallbearers and a Bugler. They were generally buried in the camp cemetery, with a wooden cross showing name, rank, number and unit. The service was conducted by the camp Chaplin, or the Senior British Officer. Death certificates were signed by the Senior British Medical Officer, but were later confiscated by the Japanese.
      Grave plans and casualty lists were retained.
      This is not word for word, but is accurate.

      While at the IWM, I also looked at the Nelson Box, ref 66/220/1 for someone else. I do not know if you are familiar with the work of Captain David Nelson, and the Bureau of Record and Enquiry at Changi. If not, I will explain should you wish to know.
      The records within this box are incomplete to say the least.
      There was a list of RN POWs evacuated from Singapore to Sumatra, but your Uncle’s name was not on it, but as I have said, the records are incomplete. His name may be on another list that could be at the PRO, but I cannot confirm that. I looked at this as I had hoped to find details of the ship he left Singapore on.
      RN personnel were evacuated before the fall, with the exception of the Royal Marines, but sad to say, I failed in this search.

      Good luck with your search, and keep in touch,
      With kindest regards
      Keith


      William Robert Warner
      14 June 1921 – 14 September 1942

      My early childhood memories include, visiting my Gran and looking at a black and white photograph of a good-looking man in naval uniform. I remember asking my Gran who he was and being told ‘he’s your Uncle Bill’. I later recall being told by my Mother that I must not talk to my Gran about Uncle Bill, as it would be too upsetting for her. It was explained to me that
      Uncle Bill was on a ship in the second world war, called the HMS Repulse, that it was sunk by the Japanese, ‘he swam ashore’, was taken prisoner. He then became ill, but was still made to work and as a result died. From that moment on when I visited my Gran, my eyes were always drawn to my Uncle’s photograph and his medals proudly displayed alongside my Granddad’s. I was desperate to find out more about him, but didn’t dare ask. He had become my ‘hero’, someone who had died 17 years before I was born.

      Some months ago I attended the funeral of my friend’s father. Her father had previously been a merchant seaman during World War II. While at the funeral my friend and her husband showed me information they had found on the Internet, regarding the ship that my friend’s father had served on. This prompted me to think of my Uncle, and I wondered if I could find any information about him on the Internet as well.

      I therefore spent sometime searching; entering the names of HMS Repulse and Prince of Wales and any other keywords I thought may be relevant.

      After discovering the Force Z survivors website, set up in memorial to the families and crew of the HMS Repulse and the HMS Prince of Wales, I noticed that my Uncle was not on the list of casualties, I contacted them with my surviving Uncles permission and they offered to set up a memorial page for him.

      I then discovered the website for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and found my Uncle Bill’s details. I was puzzled as it stated his ship was HMS Sultan, further research on the Internet, revealed it to be a shore base at Singapore. I then became curious as to what had happened to my Uncle in the months from the sinkings, until his capture and then also until his death. I visited several libraries, and websites. One such website was the FEPOW (Far East Prisoners of War) Community website, set up for the servicemen and families. After requesting information, I was contacted by a Keith Andrews, who informed me that he had a copy of a book ‘Sunset Over Saigon’ in which my Uncle was mentioned. Keith informed me that my Uncle died at Tavoy and that he had been put to work on the aerodrome there and was never put to work on the railways. As this book is out of print Keith kindly photocopied it for me and sent me a copy.

      In the meantime, after Keith told me that Bill was a member of the ‘British Sumatra Battalion’, I started searching on the Internet for more information on this battalion. I discovered a book of the same name written by A A Apthorp, the wife of the Commanding Officer of the Battalion. Again my Uncle is mentioned in the back of the book in two different places. I tried to obtain a copy of this book, but unfortunately it is now out of print and copies are very few and far between and as a result quite expensive to buy. However, I managed to locate two copies at two different libraries, one in Surrey and one in the Military section of Aldershot library. The book from Aldershot is in pristine condition, which I initially thought was fantastic, however, it would appear that no one has read this book, which saddened me somewhat. I contacted the publishers of this book, and they in turn sent my details on to the Sergeant Major of the Battalion, who had himself, recently published a book.

      In the meantime, on the advice of Keith Andrews I also wrote to Peter Dunstan of the ‘British Far East Prisoners of War Graves Archives’. Peter was a Royal Marine on the HMS Prince of Wales.
      He discovered that no official records exists as to where any of the servicemen died or from what, only that their names are recorded and referenced in the 70 Commonwealth War Graves Registers or on War Memorials. Peter is attempting to build up a complete archive of the 23,609 British Servicemen, who died or were murdered by the Japanese while Prisoners of War. Peter mentioned that he had an original diary written by Captain Apthorp in 1946 and has offered me a photocopy, I have accepted his offer; hopefully it will arrive shortly. Peter said that ‘for reasons known to those in charge of the Royal Navy at the time, he (Uncle Bill) was not redrafted back to Colombo India to another ship but was retained in Singapore for manning small rescue craft and transferred to the Shore base known as “HMS Sultan”’. Peter goes on to say ‘As no records exist as they were all destroyed due to the Surrender of Singapore on the 15th Feb and the Dutch in Java and Sumatra on the 5th March, it cannot be confirmed if he escaped with others from Singapore before the surrender OR if he was drafted to get to Sumatra and then possibly to India, but having got to Sumatra, he then with many others made his way across the Island to the port of PADANG, which is on the Indian Ocean side where IF ships had been available he would have got to India. He was unlucky and was taken Prisoner there on the 17 March’. This certainly shows my Uncle’s Naval Service History to be incorrect, in that it states he was taken prisoner on 4 March interned in camp in Singapore where he died on 14 September 1942.

      I then received a letter from Eric Burgoyne, the Sergeant Major, asking me to telephone him, his letter also said that the book ‘The British Sumatra Battalion’, when first published, a copy was sent to all the survivors of the battalion and those who did not survive a copy was sent to their next of kin, (if they were traceable). I spent quite a long time on the phone discussing my Uncle with him. The book Eric had just published is called 'The Tattered Remnants' in which my Uncle is yet again mentioned at the back as being a member of the battalion. The author has sent me a signed copy of his book. Eric said that Uncle Bill would not have suffered as much as the others, because he died before they became emaciated.

      He said that clothing was a problem as most of them had to swim ashore from various vessels, but that on their travels from Padang up to the North Coast of Sumatra they stole what they could on the way. He said that they had to use coconut shells to eat out of; they also stole lampshades and stuck corks in them. The attitude was 'help your self and god bless you’ He said that there was an outbreak of dysentery in Mergui, and that was what was likely to have caused the death of my Uncle. He went on to say that my Uncle would have been cared for in hospital and that medicine would have been stolen for him. He said that the care in the hospital was not due to the Japs being concerned, but that they were told to 'get the cattle up to work on the railway and not carcasses'

      There was a Petty Officer called Jan Tucker who was very caring of the navy men in the battalion and took them under his wing. I think that he may well have been the PO who visited my Gran after the war to tell her what happened. Eric (who I spoke to) certainly felt the same about this, however, unfortunately Jan Tucker died some years ago.

      Eric felt that although it was of little consolation, but that Bill died at the time when there was no emaciation, or little hope, or desperation. He said that he would have been cared for in the hospital and would have had a hospital bed, although basic, but he would have also have been given better food.

      Eric has contacted me again, and is sending me copies of a write up about the Cemetery my Uncle is buried in and also a copy of the memorial service held there in 1946.

      I have also found out from Andy Wade, that every year a memorial service is held on 10 December in different parts of the country to enable as many survivors and families to attend at least occasionally if the service is held close to them.

      I have just received an email from Keith Andrews, who went to the Imperial War Museum to carry out research on his father, and while he was there he discovered the following information about Uncle Bill: -

      DPA2/1 - The hand written nominal roll of the Battalion. This is original, and I imagine compiled and kept at great risk to those involved. Discovery of written records normally resulted in sever punishment or execution of the individual(s) involved. The pages of this book are divided into columns across the page, but for ease of reading, I will list the headings and the entries made for your Uncle:

      Name - Warner W R
      Number - DJ/X 152064
      Rank - AB
      Unit - RN
      Kumi - blank, as this did not apply at this stage
      Religion - RC
      Date of Birth - 14/6/21
      Address - c/o J. Scott, Nurseries, Marriot, Somerset (this is
      not shown on the CWGC site entry)
      Next of Kin - Mother
      Cause of Death - DYS = Dysentery
      Grave Number - PW D7 (this would have been at Tavoy. After the
      war, he would have been disinterred, and reburied at
      Thanbyuzayat Military Cemetery with full military honours)
      Misc. - Died 14/9/42
      Remarks - Tavoy

      DPA5 - this was the one file I did consider copying, as it does provide background information on several areas.
      Part 2 of the report is headed Treatment, and lists 3 camps in Burma the Battalion were in once the arrived from Sumatra. I will put the details of each camp on a spreadsheet, and forward them to you, but the three camps were;
      Mergui - National High School Camp - 25/5/42 - 21/6/43
      Mergui - New Camp - 21/6/42 - 10/8/42
      Tavoy - Ann Heseldine Home Camp - 11/8/42 - 21/10/42

      The Tavoy camp was the last camp your Uncle was in. Sanitary arrangements were inadequate as noted in the file, and this could have contributed to your Uncles passing.

      Another heading is Casualties, and the following is noted under that heading;
      All were given a Military Funeral, with Escort, Pallbearers and a Bugler. They were generally buried in the camp cemetery, with a wooden cross showing name, rank, number and unit. The service was conducted by the camp Chaplin, or the Senior British Officer. Death certificates were signed by the Senior British Medical Officer, but were later confiscated by the Japanese.
      Grave plans and casualty lists were retained.
      This is not word for word, but is accurate.

      While at the IWM, I also looked at the Nelson Box, ref 66/220/1 for someone else. I do not know if you are familiar with the work of Captain David Nelson, and the Bureau of Record and Enquiry at Changi. If not, I will explain should you wish to know.
      The records within this box are incomplete to say the least.
      There was a list of RN POWs evacuated from Singapore to Sumatra, but your Uncle's name was not on it, but as I have said, the records are incomplete. His name may be on another list that could be at the PRO, but I cannot confirm that. I looked at this as I had hoped to find details of the ship he left Singapore on.
      RN personnel were evacuated before the fall, with the exception of the Royal Marines, but sad to say, I failed in this search.

      Finally I have also discovered a ‘Colchester Heroes’ Website, and queried why Uncle Bill was not listed under this site. They have now amended their records and Uncle Bill is now included as a Colchester Hero. Whilst looking at their website, I discovered 4 other Warners: -

      Warner, Ernest F
      Warner, Lawson
      Warner, W J
      Warner, William Alfred
      Who died in World War I, all from Colchester………..

      Ann Norton

      18 December 2002

      Keith - >Janet (Janet Uhr this time),
      It would appear Ann managed to get a copy of the book you mention from the Military Library in Aldershot to read. Second hand copies in the UK, cost between 30 to 60, depending on condition. I do not think that Ann is on the FEPOW Group list, so that may be why you could not contact her. I am thinking of getting a copy of the book concerned, but the prices are a bit rich for me at present. Sunset over Siagon uses Major Apthorp's original notes, but that too is out of print, it was a pure fluke I managed to get a copy. Thank you for your message, it is good to hear from you as I now know two "shielas" down under, the other one I think you know, Di Elliott. Small world!
      I look forward to hearing from you again.

      David - Keith, Sorry for being so long answering, but have been trying to locate my copy of "The Escape From Singapore" to no avail!
      There is much info in this book re-Naval escapees, and may be of assistance :- By Richard Gough, ISBN 0-7183-0655-4.

      Can't be of more help.

      May I ask, where you got your copy of "Death On The Hell Ships", and is it by G.Micho?

      Arthur - The book Ships From Hell which I am asured lists all the Japanese Hell Ships was written by Raymond Lamont Brown
      Last Year ISBN 0-7509-2719-4 It costs 20.00 from all the best bookshops.

      Keith - >David, Trust you are well, and thanks for the info.
      Death on the Hellships is by Gregory F.Michno, ISBN 0-85052-821-6, I got mine direct from Pen and Sword Books, but the title is available from Arthur.

      Good book which I have used quite a bit. I see Arthur Lane has sent details of another which I will try to get hold of. If Arthur says it's good it is well worth the look. I hope he plans to add this to the list of books available from his site.

      David - Thanks Arthur
      25% off at W.H.Smiths!

       

 

 

 

Waters, Richard Albun , Gunner 1777633

      Ken Waters - kwaters1@bigpond.net.au
      Gunner 1777633 Richard Albun Waters
      I have traced a relative who died on Friday 13th February 1942 aged 21yrs who is buried in Kranji War Cemetery Singapore. All I know is that He served with the Royal Artillery. Any further information welcomed.
       

 

 

 

Wilson David Thomas (Tommy) 1119334

      rbrooker - I'm researching my Grandfathers war history - looking for information on his regiment's activities in Java, and their life in Camp #6 Fukuoka, Japan. His name was Wilson David Thomas (Tommy) 1119334. Of the 100 men held in camp #6, 98 survived and were, apparently repatriated. The two that died were my grandfather and his best friend - . My Mother never met her father, and my widowed grandmother, married for just over a year, never got over her grief. I do also know a bit more - but too much to type here! Do you know anyone else from Camp 6 - esp. from Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders? or about the activities of the 137 Field Regt. RA. Did you survive Camp 6? Please get in touch

 

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